Scrabo Tower, Northern Ireland
Scrabo Tower, Northern Ireland

The undulating maritime landscape of North Down has been watched over for more than a century by the Londonderry Monument, commonly known as Scrabo Tower. This turreted tower, as it stands today, was built on a site 540 feet above sea level and is 125 feet (41 metres) high. The walls are over a metre thick and the entire building is constructed of stone from Scrabo Hill.
Erected in 1857, the Tower was built by local people as a monument to Charles William Stewart, 3rd Marquess of Londonderry. Besides earning fame and fortune overseas, the Marquis was held in high regard in Ireland for his attempts to alleviate suffering during the potato famine in the second quarter of the nineteenth century. His generosity and kindness to his tenants gained him a level of respect, which was not commonly given to the landed gentry and led to a communal desire to erect a monument in his memory.

Location: Newtownards, Northern Ireland

Photographer: Martin J. Bryers.

Scrabo Tower, Northern Ireland

The undulating maritime landscape of North Down has been watched over for more than a century by the Londonderry Monument, commonly known as Scrabo Tower. This turreted tower, as it stands today, was built on a site 540 feet above sea level and is 125 feet (41 metres) high. The walls are over a metre thick and the entire building is constructed of stone from Scrabo Hill.
Erected in 1857, the Tower was built by local people as a monument to Charles William Stewart, 3rd Marquess of Londonderry. Besides earning fame and fortune overseas, the Marquis was held in high regard in Ireland for his attempts to alleviate suffering during the potato famine in the second quarter of the nineteenth century. His generosity and kindness to his tenants gained him a level of respect, which was not commonly given to the landed gentry and led to a communal desire to erect a monument in his memory.

Location: Newtownards, Northern Ireland

Photographer: Martin J. Bryers.